Metric Thickness of Dough

by connie on April 14, 2013

In making springerle, rolling the dough thickly enough before imprinting with the cookie mold will make a big difference in the beauty of the print. A couple of people have asked the thickness in millimeters. For most cookie molds I suggest that the dough be rolled to about 0.50 inches which is 12.7 mm. If a cookie mold is very shallow, roll the dough slightly thinner and if it is a very deep mold, roll the dough slightly thicker. You will be applying additional pressure when you press the mold onto the dough and if it is not thick enough, you will not get the impression of the deeper parts of the carving.

Try it! Using a medium depth mold, roll a small amount of dough about 8mm thick and press your mold into the rolled dough, and then roll a small amount of dough about 13mm thick and compare the prints! Or just try it with play dough and see the difference

Connie

{ 5 comments }

You Can Still Make Springerle

by connie on December 21, 2012

You’ve been busy; I get it. You meant to have your Springerle neatly packed in silver tins on Thanksgiving weekend, but somehow it’s only 4 days until Christmas and you finally have some time this weekend to make them. If you want the traditional flavor  anise, as I do, you probably know that aging the cookies  will develop the anise flavor.

So here’s what you can do: add some extra anise oil and enjoy your springerle on Christmas Day. I know many of you are using different recipes than mine, so add about 20% more anise oil to your batch. So in a recipe calling for 1/2 teaspoon of anise oil, I would add a scant 1/8 teaspoon of extra oil since 1/8th teaspoon would be 25% of 1/2 teaspoon. Not good with math? Here is a chart with a few measurements and the additional amounts:

1 teaspoon             add scant 1/4 teaspoon

1/2 teaspoon         add scant 1/8 teaspoon

2 teaspoons           add scant  1/2 teaspoon

1 1/2 teaspoons     add scant 1/4 teaspoon and scant 1/8 teaspoon

Don’t change the fruit oil (lemon or orange) or nut oil measurements . They will be fine. In fact, I like to enjoy the lemon and orange Sringerle right away.

Enjoy the Holidays and a Very Merry Christmas to you!

Connie

{ 6 comments }

More Summer Springerle Tips

by connie on July 11, 2012

I discovered a few more tricks that are helping me cope with the challenges of summer Springerle baking, so I’ll share them here with all of you:

  • Make the dough, place it in a tightly sealed plastic bag and then refrigerate it overnight and up to 2 days before forming the cookies.
  • When you place the cookies on a surface to dry, give them plenty of spacing, at least 2 inches of air space around each cookie.
  • Let the cookies dry longer than 24 hours. Try 36 or 48 hours for larger cookies.
  • Dry the cookies on a cookie sheet lined with flour sack tea towels, which will absorb more moisture than parchment paper and then move the dried cookies to a cookie sheet for baking.

I hope these tips will help you!

Connie

{ 16 comments }

Egg-actly! Eggs do come in all sizes…

by connie on March 21, 2012

Clearly, all eggs are not created equal. Most baking recipes call for large eggs and in general , if a recipe does not give a size, you can assume that a large egg is what is used. But chickens do not manufacture eggs to exact sizes, so here are some notes about making springerle doughs and how egg sizes might  change your procedure.

In a large batch springerle recipe, as most springerle recipes are, eggs are an important and proportionally large amount ingredient. A large egg is aproximately 2 ounces in the shell and approximately 1.75 ounces without the shell. Therefore 6 large eggs out of the shell should weigh 10.5 ounces and in a liquid measuring cup will measure 1.32 cups ( between 1 1/4 and 1 1/3 cups.) If you use other size eggs, it would be a really good idea to weigh the shelled eggs. Do remember that each size egg has a range of weight within it falls, so if you have particularly big large eggs, they may weigh more than 10.5 ounces, or particularly small large eggs, they may weigh  less than 10.5 ounces. So, the very most accurate procedure for preparing the dough is to use 10.5 ounces.

Bakeries and professional bakers working with large batch recipes are in the habit of weighing all ingredients for baking. Home bakers, accustomed to working with small batches, are not routinely weighing ingredients.  Food scales are now readily available, usually digital, small and fairly inexpensive . If you are a perfectionist, a beginner or have a scientific bent, weighing the ingredients, especially in large batch recipes, will result in more predictable  results.

Remember that baking is both a science and an art!

Connie

{ 14 comments }

Most Common Springerle Boo-Boos

by connie on December 5, 2011

Thought some “newbys” to springerle baking might need a quick rundown of the most common mistakes:

  • Not letting the cookies dry long enough resulting in less distinct impressions. The cookies will taste fine, but will not be as pretty.
  • Rolling the dough too thickly, resulting in a cookie that rises too much and overpuffs the imprinted design.
  • Rolling the dough too thinly, resulting in a springerle that is very hard.
  • Overbaking the cookies until they are rocks

It’s true that molded cookies are by no means the easiest cookies to make, but if you read every entry in this blog, many of your questions will be answered. I do find that just when I think I have answered every possible concern, another question pops up, so I’ll just keep at it. I almost always learn something new every day and that is a good thing!

And remember….it’s only a cookie!  Your cookie baking should be fun! It will take a few batches to perfect your skill.

Connie

{ 48 comments }

Yep – The Gingerbread recipe is Vegan

by connie on November 27, 2011

I have had several people point out that the recipe for the gingerbread cookies is vegan. I had not thought about it before posting the gingerbread recipe, so am grateful to those of you who noticed. I have a few people in my circle who will be getting this treat , some who are vegan and some who are not!

Bake and make a vegan happy!

Connie

{ 11 comments }

Countdown Has Begun

by connie on November 14, 2011

Yep, Halloween is done and we are deluged with thoughts of what needs to be done in preparation for the holiday season. You can make your springerle now and mark it off your list.

Just remember to enjoy the process and  the preparations!

Happy Baking!

Connie

{ 17 comments }

Want to make molded gingerbread in your springerle molds?

by connie on October 22, 2011

Here’s a recipe that I developed this summer; it will make beautiful and tasty gingerbread. Be sure to choose a deeply and boldly carved design, one without really  fine details.  You’ll make the non springerle lovers very happy!

Happy Baking!

Connie

Gingerbread cookies using M4060 Swiss Sextet

Molded Gingerbread Cookies

Put into large mixing bowl and whisk together:

  • 3  cups plus 2 tablespoons unbleached flour
  • ¾ teaspoon baking soda
  • ½ cup sugar
  • 1 ½ teaspoons cinnamon
  • ½ teaspoon ground cloves
  • 2 teaspoons ground ginger
  • ½ teaspoon nutmeg
  • ½ teaspoon salt

Measure into a large measuring cup and mix thoroughly:

  • ½ cup vegetable oil
  • ½ cup molasses
  • ½ cup dark corn syrup
  • 2 tablespoons water

Now combine the flour mixture and the liquid mixture together either by hand or in a heavy standard mixer using the flat blade (not the whisk).  Mix until the dough holds together, adding 1 or 2 tablespoons of water only if necessary to bind the dough. Knead the dough into a solid mass and place into a tightly sealed zipper bag.  Let the dough rest for 1 hour or refrigerate overnight.

On a lightly floured surface, roll the dough with a plain rolling pin about ½ to 5/8 inch thick, depending on the depth of your cookie mold.  Using a pastry brush, flour the surface of your cookie mold. Press firmly onto the flat surface of the dough and then lift the mold straight up. Reflour the mold for every pressing.

Cut and place the cookies on a parchment lined cookie sheet. Let cookies dry for 8 – 12 hours.

Bake at 300 degrees for 12 minutes. Large cookies will need 14-15 minutes.

You can also use all molasses, but you will need to add an additional 6 Tablespoons of flour.

This recipe is easy to double.

{ 34 comments }

Spread the tradition!

by connie on October 16, 2011

I just returned from teaching a Springerle class at the Birmingham Bake and Cook Co. in Birmingham, AL. What a great group of enthusiastic cookie bakers we had! Thanks to the proprietor, Susan Green, for welcoming me to her shop for the class.

I am always so happy to share the tradition!

Connie

{ 6 comments }

One more damp weather tip!

by connie on September 18, 2011

Yes, I need some springerle and this is the only day I can make them this week….and guess what, IT”S RAINING! Which reminded me of one other tip that I did not put in my notes about weather conditions.

When it is damp or raining, space your cookies further apart to give additional air circulation. Don’t put them on the tray to dry with only 1/2 inch spacing between the cookies, but give them 1 1/2 to 2 inches between cookies. You will use more trays, but they will dry better.

Happy Baking!

Connie

{ 5 comments }